Answer

Are there different types of background checks?

There are two different types of background checks; instant and comprehensive. Instant background checks, also known as “national criminal database searches” provide general information pulled from a commercially available database. These searches aren’t corroborated against any official county court record. Although they are quick, they can often return with error-filled information, since it’s not derived from a verified source. Comprehensive background checks, like DISA’s, involve multiple National Association of Professional Background Screeners (NAPBS) FCRA certified employees confirming that all information aligns with the person who is being checked. These individuals also must hold a private investigator license in order to legally be able to research and verify information about the applicant. This process verifies that the information is accurate and is not information from an alias with the same name as the applicant being screened.

It’s important to have a clear and concise written policy, which remains consistent for all candidates who apply. Background checks must remain compliant with the regulations set forth by the Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA) and in addition, must also comply with state laws as they vary by state. Before running a background check, the candidate must be notified and give written consent for the employer to proceed with the check. Not all background checks are the same and depending on the industry can vary on what is required. Standard background checks often include criminal history checks, employment and education verification, SSN validity, etc. Some positions require more, such as DOT testing history, state driving records, credit reports, sex offender searches, etc. Once a candidate is hired, employers are required to fulfill an I-9 and E-Verify, which verifies the identity and eligibility to work for all new employees. By following these steps you can help ensure your background process is as safe and effective as possible.

If the employee is non-DOT regulated, then yes you may have a single specimen collection. But for those who are DOT regulated, you cannot. (Please see Part 40 below).

40.17 How does the collector prepare the specimens?

a. All collections under DOT agency drug testing regulations must be split specimen collections.

b. As the collector, you must take the following steps, in order, after the employee brings the urine specimen to you. You must take these steps in the presence of the employee.

  1. Check the box on the CCF (Step 2) indicating that this was a split specimen collection.
  2. You, not the employee, must first pour at least 30mL of urine from the collection container into one specimen bottle, to be used for the primary specimen.
  3. You, not the employee, must then pour at least 15 mL of urine from the collection container into the second specimen bottle to be used for the split specimen.
  4. You, not the employee, must place and secure (i.e., tighten or snap) the lids/caps on the bottles.
  5. You, not the employee, must seal the bottles by placing the tamper-evident bottle seals over the bottle caps/lids and down the sides of the bottles.

CBD oil can be made from both marijuana and hemp. Hemp based CBD oils, when used in low doses, are unlikely to result in a positive test because they often don’t contain high enough levels of THC for detection. If an employee is using hemp-derived CBD oil, most individuals would have to consume a relatively large amount of the product, to test non-negative. Note: Taking that much CBD oil could result in the user’s impairment.

Doses aren’t standardized across brands and some recommend higher doses than others. In addition, hemp-derived CBD oils aren’t FDA regulated and the advertised THC levels of products can be unreliable. As a result of varying dose recommendations and uncertain THC levels, taking CBD oil comes with a risk of a non-negative test result.