Answer

How does DISA know what jurisdictions to check?

DISA accesses a database that consists of more than 180 million criminal record files, which have been compiled from a variety of sources, including local law enforcement, statewide criminal record repositories, departments of corrections, state parole and probation records, local public records sources, etc. to identify pointer data to be verified at the source. DISA also uses data sources to compile counties where a person may have lived. The database file may uncover multiple states/jurisdictions where the applicant had no previous address history. These products serve as a pointer used to determine the jurisdictions in which an individual has lived, worked, or attended school for purposes of criminal history ordering.

Background Check related

What does background check mean?

For many employers, a background screen is usually conducted as a simple pre-employment process, but depending on the industry and position they can become quite complex and vary. This gives an employer a closer look into an individual’s background to help verify if they are suitable for the job position. DISA offers a variety of products that can be combined to create a custom program that helps you maintain compliance and meet industry standards.

CBD oil can be made from both marijuana and hemp. Hemp based CBD oils, when used in low doses, are unlikely to result in a positive test because they often don’t contain high enough levels of THC for detection. If an employee is using hemp-derived CBD oil, most individuals would have to consume a relatively large amount of the product, to test non-negative. Note: Taking that much CBD oil could result in the user’s impairment.

Doses aren’t standardized across brands and some recommend higher doses than others. In addition, hemp-derived CBD oils aren’t FDA regulated and the advertised THC levels of products can be unreliable. As a result of varying dose recommendations and uncertain THC levels, taking CBD oil comes with a risk of a non-negative test result.

The adverse action process is required for any action taken that denies an individual employment, credit, insurance, etc. based on information obtained through a consumer report. This three-step process complies with federal laws to protect applicants from discrimination. Although it’s the law, many companies still fail to send adverse action notices, subjecting them to potential lawsuits. Employers must abide by the guidelines set forth by the Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA) which requires the employer to provide a standalone disclosure informing the applicant that a consumer report may be obtained with written consent. The employer must also provide a copy of the pre-adverse notice, background report, and summary of rights to the applicant prior to an adverse action decision. If any adverse information appears on their background check, then a pre-adverse notice is used to inform the employee that something has returned which may or may not affect their hiring decision. This gives the employee an opportunity to file a dispute prior to receiving a final adverse action notice. An adverse action notice must be sent only if the employer denies the applicant employment based on the information from the background check.