Answer

What shows up on a background screen?

Background screenings can vary depending on certain positions, industry standards, and state laws. Background products can include,

•    Criminal History Checks (Federal, State, and County)

•    Civil Searches (Federal and County)

•    SSN Validity Checks

•    Employment Verifications

•    Education Verifications

•    I-9 and E-Verify

•    State Driving Records

•    Professional Licenses and Credentials

•    Credit Reports

•    Adverse Action Notices

•    Personal Reference Verifications

•    Government Sanctions Lists

•    Sex Offender Searches

•    DOT Testing History

•    Criminal Investigative Services

It’s important to have a clear and concise written policy, which remains consistent for all candidates who apply. Background checks must remain compliant with the regulations set forth by the Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA) and in addition, must also comply with state laws as they vary by state. Before running a background check, the candidate must be notified and give written consent for the employer to proceed with the check. Not all background checks are the same and depending on the industry can vary on what is required. Standard background checks often include criminal history checks, employment and education verification, SSN validity, etc. Some positions require more, such as DOT testing history, state driving records, credit reports, sex offender searches, etc. Once a candidate is hired, employers are required to fulfill an I-9 and E-Verify, which verifies the identity and eligibility to work for all new employees. By following these steps you can help ensure your background process is as safe and effective as possible.

Organizations owe it to themselves and their customers to research the background of potential employees and volunteers to ensure the safety of other employees, customers, and their property. The most effective method to accomplish this is by conducting thorough background checks. The costs of fraud, embezzlement, theft, and violence are a multi-billion dollar drain on our economy, bleeding organizations both large and small. One of the most compelling reasons organizations now conduct background checks is to uncover deception or fraud. For example, it can confirm whether an individual provided accurate information on his/her resume or application. Depending on the industry, some form of background investigation may be required, whether because it is mandated by law or because their insurance company demands it.

A credit report is sourced at one of the three major credit bureaus. A credit report can reveal if an applicant has lived at a particular address or addresses for a length of time and can be an indicator of how responsibly he/she has handled personal financial affairs. In some states, this product can only be used for certain positions, such as fiduciary or executive management positions, or for certain regulated employers. Note, no credit score is provided on the credit report for employment purposes. State and local laws restrict when a credit report can be obtained for employment purposes.