Answer

Do online background checks really work?

A growing trend with the employment screening industry is the use of commercially compiled databases, also known as instant background checks or “national criminal database searches.” These types of checks are quicker and cheaper but lack accuracy and credibility and put employers at a greater risk of fines and lawsuits from the Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA).

In most cases, a background check is good for two years. You should check with the contractor's employer for a specific owner’s time frame.

It’s important to have a clear and concise written policy, which remains consistent for all candidates who apply. Background checks must remain compliant with the regulations set forth by the Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA) and in addition, must also comply with state laws as they vary by state. Before running a background check, the candidate must be notified and give written consent for the employer to proceed with the check. Not all background checks are the same and depending on the industry can vary on what is required. Standard background checks often include criminal history checks, employment and education verification, SSN validity, etc. Some positions require more, such as DOT testing history, state driving records, credit reports, sex offender searches, etc. Once a candidate is hired, employers are required to fulfill an I-9 and E-Verify, which verifies the identity and eligibility to work for all new employees. By following these steps you can help ensure your background process is as safe and effective as possible.

DISA accesses a database that consists of more than 180 million criminal record files, which have been compiled from a variety of sources, including local law enforcement, statewide criminal record repositories, departments of corrections, state parole and probation records, local public records sources, etc. to identify pointer data to be verified at the source. DISA also uses data sources to compile counties where a person may have lived. The database file may uncover multiple states/jurisdictions where the applicant had no previous address history. These products serve as a pointer used to determine the jurisdictions in which an individual has lived, worked, or attended school for purposes of criminal history ordering.