Answer

If states overturn previous marijuana convictions, how does it impact background checks?

With the legalization of marijuana across many states, cities such as San Francisco have implemented conviction expunging policies (Proposition 64) which remove misdemeanors and non-violent charges related to marijuana. Policies like these aim to get previous convictions reduced or reclassified to lesser offenses, with some convictions being dismissed altogether. This means that charges that are expunged will not appear on background checks. Employers need to implement a comprehensive background check process that will navigate individual state and city regulations. When employers use cheaper instant background checks, information can be incorrect or outdated, which could lead to potential lawsuits or liability in the workplace.

In addition, employers should consider services, such as social security number validity, criminal history for federal, county, and state, employment verification, etc., to provide the most accurate and up-to-date information.

Pre-employment background checks are the most common. As an employer, you want to ensure a safe hire every time to protect your company’s reputation and workplace safety. Employees are often screened during the hiring process with a background check according to the company’s policy. Depending on the employer and the industry, background checks can vary greatly.

If the background check was with DISA, you can dispute it from our Applicant Assistance page.

A credit report is sourced at one of the three major credit bureaus. A credit report can reveal if an applicant has lived at a particular address or addresses for a length of time and can be an indicator of how responsibly he/she has handled personal financial affairs. In some states, this product can only be used for certain positions, such as fiduciary or executive management positions, or for certain regulated employers. Note, no credit score is provided on the credit report for employment purposes. State and local laws restrict when a credit report can be obtained for employment purposes.