Answer

Who needs to get a permit for the Spotted Lanternfly?

According to the Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture, permits are required for all businesses and organizations who will be moving within or from the quarantine zone while working. More details and examples can be found on the Agriculture main website: Spotted Lanternfly Information on the DPA website...

Employers who have actual knowledge that a driver has used alcohol or controlled substances in violation of Subpart B of Part 382 must report such violations to the Clearinghouse, in accordance with § 382.705(b)(4). Service agents, such as a consortium/third-party administrator (C/TPA), acting on the employer’s behalf may also report actual knowledge violations, as long as they comply with the reporting requirements in § 382.705(b)(4). Actual knowledge, as defined in § 382.107, is based on the employer’s direct observation of the employee, information provided by the driver’s previous employer(s), a traffic citation for driving a CMV while under the influence of alcohol or controlled substances, or an employee’s admission of alcohol or controlled substances use, except as provided in § 382.121.

The Clearinghouse is required for all Commercial Driver’s License (CDL) drivers operating Commercial Motor Vehicles (CMVs) on public roads, as well as for their employers and service agents. Examples include but aren’t limited to:

    Interstate and intrastate motor carriers, including passenger carriers

    School bus drivers

    Construction equipment operators

    Limousine drivers

    Municipal vehicle drivers (e.g., waste management vehicles)

    Federal and other organizations that employ drivers subject to FMCSA drug and alcohol testing regulations (e.g., Department of Defense, municipalities, school districts)

If drivers are required to have a Class B CDL in order to operate vehicles, then the FMCSA Regulations in Part 382 and Part 383 will apply to your operations. Other areas of the regulations, such as Part 391 or Part 395, may apply to the motor carrier even if they don’t leave the state. Those sections apply to motor carriers operating in interstate commerce, which cannot be determined based solely on never leaving a given state. Interstate commerce is an activity that might occur without a truck ever leaving a single city. We advise that you contact the FMCSA for assistance in determining the applicability of the regulations.